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Appendix A: First Aid Case and Kits, Dressings, and Bandages

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US Army First Aid Manual
Fundamental Criteria for First Aid
Basic Measures for First Aid
First Aid for Special Wounds
First Aid for Fractures
First Aid for Climatic Injuries
First Aid for Bites and Stings
First Aid in Toxic Environments
First Aid for Psychological Reactions
Appendix A: First Aid Case and Kits, Dressings, and Bandages
Appendix B: Rescue and Transportation Procedures
Appendix C: Common Problems/Conditions
Appendix D: Digital Pressure
Appendix E: Decontamination Procedures
Appendix F: Glossary



Appendix A: First Aid Case and Kits, Dressings, and Bandages

A-1. First Aid Case with Field Dressings and Bandages

Every soldier is issued a first aid case (Figure A-1B). He carries it at all times for his use. The field first aid dressing is a standard sterile (germ-free) compress or pad with bandages attached (Figure A-1C). This dressing is used to cover the wound, to protect against further contamination, and to stop bleeding (pressure dressing). When a soldier administers first aid to another person, he must remember to use the wounded person's dressing; he may need his own later. The soldier must check his first aid case regularly and replace any used or missing dressing. The field first aid dressing may normally be obtained through the medical unit's assigned medical platoon or section.

A-2. General Purpose First Aid Kits

General purpose first aid kits listed in paragraph A-3 are also listed in CTA 8-100. These kits are carried on Army vehicles, aircraft, and boats for use by the operators, crew, and passengers. Individuals designated by unit standing operating procedures (SOP) to be responsible for the kits are required to check them regularly and replace all items used, or replace the entire kit when necessary. The general purpose kit and its contents can be obtained through the unit supply system.

NOTE

    Periodically check the dressings (for holes or tears in the package) and the medicines
    (for expiration date) that are in the first aid kits. If necessary, replace defective or
    outdated items.

A-3. Contents of First Aid Case and Kits

The following items are listed in the Common Table of Allowances (CTA) as indicated below. However, it is necessary to see referenced CTA for stock numbers.

                                                       Unit of
   CTA        Nomenclature                             Issue        Quantity

a. 50-900 ...CASE FIELD FIRST AID DRESSING............ each.......... 1 Contents: 8-100.....Dressing, first aid field, individual troop, white, 4 by 7 inches.............. each.......... 1 b. 8-100 ....FIRST AID KIT, general purpose........... each.......... 1 (Rigid Case) Contents: Case, medical instrument and supply set, plastic, rigid, size A, 7 1/2 inches long by 4 1/2 inches wide by 2 3/4 inches high............... each.......... 1 Ammonia inhalation solution, aromatic, ampules, 1/3 ml, 10s.................... package....... 1 Povidone-iodine solution, USP: 10% 1/2 fl oz, 50s.......................... box........... 1/50 Dressing, first aid, field, individual troop, camouflaged, 4 by 7 inches....... each.......... 3 Compress and bandage, camouflaged, 2 by 2 inches, 4s....................... package....... 1 Bandage, gauze, compressed, camouflaged, 3 inches by 6 yards........ each.......... 2 Bandage, muslin, compressed, camouflaged, 37 by 37 by 52 inches...... each.......... 1 Gauze, petrolatum, 3 by 36 inches, 3s.... package....... 1 Adhesive tape, surgical 1 inch by 1 1/2 yards, 100s............. package....... 3/100 Bandage, adhesive, 3/4 by 3 inches 300s.................................... box........... 18/300 Blade, surgical preparation razor, straight, single edge, 5s............... package....... 1 First aid kit, eye dressing.............. each.......... 1 Instruction card, artificial respiration, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation (Graphic Training Aid 21-45) (in English)................. each.......... 1 Instruction sheet, first aid (in English)............................ each.......... 1 Instruction sheet and list of contents (in English)................... each.......... 1 c. 8-100.....FIRST AID KIT, general purpose........... each.......... 1 (panel-mounted) Contents: Case, medical instrument and supply set, nylon, nonrigid, No. 2, 7 1/2 inches long by 4 3/8 inches wide by 4 1/2 inches high............... each.......... 1 In Upper Ammonia Inhalation Solution Pocket.... aromatic, ampules, 1/3 ml, 10s.......... package....... 1 Compress and bandage, camouflaged, 2 by 2 inches, 4s....................... package....... 1 Bandage, muslin, compressed, camouflaged, 37 by 37 by 52 inches...... each.......... 1 Gauze, petrolatum, 3 by 36 inches, 12s... package....... 3/12 Blade, surgical preparation razor, straight, single edge, 5s............... package ...... 1 In Lower Pad, Povidone-Iodine, 100s............... box........... 10/100 Pocket... Dressing, first aid, field, individual troop, camouflaged, 4 by 6 inches....... each.......... 3 Bandage, gauze, compressed, camouflaged, 3 inches by 6 yards........ each.......... 2 Adhesive tape surgical, 1 inch by 1 1/2 yards, 100s............. package....... 3/100 Bandage, adhesive, 3/4 by 3 inches, 300s.................................... box........... 18/300 First aid kit, eye dressing.............. each.......... 1 Instruction card, artificial respiration, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation (Graphic Training Aid 21-45) (in English)................. each.......... 1 Instruction sheet, first aid (in English)............................ each.......... 1 Instruction sheet and list of contents (in English)................... each.......... 1

A-4. Dressings

Dressings are sterile pads or compresses used to cover wounds. They usually are made of gauze or cotton wrapped in gauze (Figure A-1C). In addition to the standard field first aid dressing, other dressings such as sterile gauze compresses and small sterile compresses on adhesive strips may be available under CTA 8-100. See paragraph A-3 above.

A-5. Standard Bandages

a. Standard bandages are made of gauze or muslin and are used over a sterile dressing to secure the dressing in place, to close off its edge from dirt and germs, and to create pressure on the wound and control bleeding. A bandage can also support an injured part or secure a splint.

b. Tailed bandages may be attached to the dressing as indicated on the field first aid dressing (Figure A-1C).

A-6. Triangular and Cravat (Swathe) Bandages

a. Triangular and cravat (or swathe) bandages (Figure A-2) are fashioned from a triangular piece of muslin (37 by 37 by 52 inches) provided in the general purpose first aid kit. If it is folded into a strip, it is called a cravat. Two safety pins are packaged with each bandage. These bandages are valuable in an emergency since they are easily applied.

b. To improvise a triangular bandage, cut a square of available material, slightly larger than 3 feet by 3 feet, and FOLD it DIAGONALLY. If two bandages are needed, cut the material along the DIAGONAL FOLD.

c. A cravat can be improvised from such common items as T-shirts, other shirts, bed linens, trouser legs, scarfs, or any other item made of pliable and durable material that can be folded, torn, or cut to the desired size.




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